Koha How-To

Playing in the Koha sandbox

Have you ever been browsing through the Koha bugs database and see a bug with a status of “needs sign off‚Äù? Have you ever reported a problem and wondered how to “sign off‚Äù to get a new feature or bug fix in to Koha? Does the thought of signing off on a bug seem scary? Well our friends at BibLibre have created some sandbox systems (systems that have Koha installed already for you) so that anyone can test and sign off on patches no matter what your skill level is. Don’t worry there will no need to talk code in this post, nor will you need to know anything about Linux, Perl, etc. I’m going to show you how, even from your Windows machine, you can test and sign off on patches for the Koha community. So let’s get started.

The first thing you will need to do is to sign up for a Bugzilla account if you don’t already have one. Sign up is easy and fast, simply go to http://bugs.koha-community.org and click the button to “Open a new account.‚Äù Once you have an account, let’s go look for some bugs to test and signoff on!

The first thing I did (to make searching easier) was to edit my preferences. Click on “Preferences‚Äù located at the top or lower portion of Bugzilla (it’s next to the Log out). Then click on Saved Searches and place a checkmark next to “Needs Signoff‚Äù (it’s been shared by Chris Cormack), click “submit changes‚Äù and now when you get back to the Home page you’ll see a “Needs Signoff‚Äù in the footer portion of the page (it’s under My Bugs).

Now the fun begins.

Click your newly created “Needs Signoff‚Äù option and then sort on the “Comp‚Äù heading. This will sort all the bugs via the module or component. Now it’s just a matter of finding a patch you want to test. I started with simple ones, ones that were just wording changes so that I could get the experience under my belt. One thing to note is most but not all, patches will have a test plan. If there is one great, if not we encourage you to post a comment to that developer asking for a test plan. Also note which version the patch is for.

Now that you found a bug to test, head over to BibLibre’s sandboxes http://wiki.koha-community.org/wiki/Sandboxes If you scroll all the way to the bottom you will see a listing of available sandboxes. Here are the steps to test a bug:

  1. Go to a sandbox and click on the URL to set up the sandbox. Please pay attention to the date of the current sandbox setup (it’s under the heading Welcome to the Koha sandbox tester). If the date is today, please don’t use that sandbox as that person who set it up might still be testing something. Simply go back to the listing and choose another one that has an older set up date.
  2. Enter the bug number, your name, email, and type Koha in the anti-spam box. For the database choose MARC21 unless you are testing a couple of patches.
  3. Check your email for a message that your sandbox is ready.
  4. Once it’s ready, go back to sandbox wiki page and go into the staff interface URL and log in with test/test You’ll see under News on the left that you are in a sandbox.
  5. Check the patch.
  6. If you are satisfied that the patch works as designed, go back to sandbox page (where you were for step 2) and towards the bottom you’ll see “Sign-off‚Äù, enter the bug #, your name, your email, and Koha for the anti-spam.
  7. Click OK.

You have now tested and signed-off on a patch! If you go back to that bug # in Bugzilla at the bottom you will see a comment that you have tested and signed off on the patch using the sandbox. Don’t worry if you don’t see it right away, keep refreshing the Bugzilla page, it will show up but might take a couple of minutes.

Easy-peasy lemon squeezy!

Read more by Melissa Lefebvre

Tags